What kit do I need?

Having the right kit can make the difference between a good adventure and a brilliant adventure. Being warm, safe and comfortable make all the difference. We can help recommend the best kit for you, should you need to go and purchase anything new and in certain instances we can hire you the more technical equipment required.

Below you will find kit lists relevant to the majority of the adventures that we offer. Please get in touch if you have any questions or want to enquire about the hire of equipment.

Walking boots
Good sturdy, waterproof walking boots.

Walking socks
These offer more padding than your everyday socks.

Walking trousers
Comfortable and able to stretch in all the right places. Softshell trousers are really comfy and provide warmth and wind resistance too.

Waterproof Jacket & Trousers (Hardshell)
Brands that use a waterproof membrane such as Gore-Tex or eVent are best. With this layer we’re looking to keep dry and protected from the wind.

Base layer
Synthetic base layers are best as they dry quickly and wick away any dampness. Cotton does not work as it holds on to the water which makes you cold.

Mid layer (Fleece or Softshell)
You might like to have a thin fleece and a softshell so that you can layer up if it gets cold. Some people prefer a fleece others prefer a softshell. With this layer we’re looking for warmth and some wind proofing. In colder weather a spare fleece is useful.

Gloves
It’s usually advisable to have at least a couple of pairs of gloves. Perhaps a liner glove to go under some thicker waterproof gloves, and even a spare pair that you keep dry in your rucksack.

Hat (and buff)
A nice woolly hat to keep you warm and buff if you like to keep the wind out around your neck. Some people like a peaked sun hat in the summer. Again a spare dry hat is useful in bad weather.

Backpack
You’ll need a backpack to hold your lunch, spare gloves, spare warm layer, first aid kit and other bits and pieces you want so you’re going to need at pack of at least 30 litres – 40 litres. A waterproof rucksack liner or dry bags are useful too.

Water
Many people like the bladder type of water container in their rucksack with the pipe and mouthpiece although a non-breakable bottle can be just as good. Make sure you have the capacity to carry at least 1.5 litres or up to 3 litres for a longer day.

Head torch
Your leaders will ensure, within their control, that you are not on the hill any longer than expected, but a head torch should be a part of everyone’s emergency kit.

Compass (Silva Expedition 4 recommended)
Not all our weekends require you to have a compass but it is always good to maintain a certain level of self reliance and a compass is a fundamental piece of kit.

Sun glasses & Sun screen
These are useful all year round although you don’t need a huge bottle of sun screen in the winter, it’ll just weigh you down.

Midge repellent
During the summer months and subject to weather conditions.

Lunch Bag or Box
To keep your lunch in one place and as unsquashed as possible. Note book and pen Particularly useful if you are on a skills weekend.

Survival bag and whistle
Survival bags are basically big, bright plastic bags used to keep you dry and warm in the event of an emergency (particularly in the winter) and are available from most outdoor shops. A whistle is useful for attracting attention in an emergency, although some rucksacks have them built in to the chest straps.

Personal first aid kit
Small first aid kit for personal use. Your leader will be carrying a bigger kit (and trained to use it).

Camera/Smart Phone and charger(s)

Regular medications

Also useful, but not essential:
Walking poles

Gaiters
Gaiters keep any water or rain from getting up the legs of your trousers and down in to your boots.

Liner gloves
Add another layer on colder days and also stop sweaty hands from sticking to the liners of your main gloves.

Liner socks
Some people swear by two sock layers, having a liner sock under their walking socks. You’ll just have to experiment with this one for yourself.

Trail food
We’ll provide you with a packed lunch but if you like to have a few bars or bags of nuts stuffed away in your rucksack feel free to bring them too.

Back at the accommodation:
Washbag
Toothbrush, toothpaste, soap, shampoo, shower gel etc.

Towel

Ear plugs

Dry change of clothes
To wear in the evenings and for your return journey.

Dry change of footwear
Plus something to wear around the lodge if you like your home comforts.

Walking boots
Good sturdy, waterproof walking boots. A more rigid boot is often preferred for scrambling, especially on higher grades.

Helmet

Climbing or mountaineering harness

Walking socks
These offer more padding than your everyday socks.

Walking trousers
Comfortable and able to stretch in all the right places. Softshell trousers are really comfy and provide warmth and wind resistance too.

Waterproof Jacket & Trousers (Hardshell)
Brands that use a waterproof membrane such as Gore-Tex or eVent are best. With this layer we’re looking to keep dry and protected from the wind.

Base layer
Synthetic base layers are best as they dry quickly and wick away any dampness. Cotton does not work as it holds on to the water which makes you cold.

Mid layer (Fleece or Softshell)
You might like to have a thin fleece and a softshell so that you can layer up if it gets cold. Some people prefer a fleece others prefer a softshell. With this layer we’re looking for warmth and some wind proofing. In colder weather a spare fleece is useful.

Gloves
It’s usually advisable to have at least a couple of pairs of gloves. Perhaps a liner glove to go under some thicker waterproof gloves, and even a spare pair that you keep dry in your rucksack.

Hat (and buff)
A nice woolly hat to keep you warm and buff if you like to keep the wind out around your neck. Some people like a peaked sun hat in the summer. Again a spare dry hat is useful in bad weather.

Backpack
You’ll need a backpack to hold your lunch, spare gloves, spare warm layer, first aid kit and other bits and pieces you want so you’re going to need at pack of at least 30 litres – 40 litres. A waterproof rucksack liner or dry bags are useful too.

Water
Many people like the bladder type of water container in their rucksack with the pipe and mouthpiece although a non-breakable bottle can be just as good. Make sure you have the capacity to carry at least 1.5 litres or up to 3 litres for a longer day.

Head torch
Your leaders will ensure, within their control, that you are not on the hill any longer than expected, but a head torch should be a part of everyone’s emergency kit.

Compass (Silva Expedition 4 recommended)
Not all our weekends require you to have a compass but it always to maintain a certain level of self reliance and a compass is a fundamental piece of kit.

Sun glasses & Sun screen
These are useful all year round although you don’t need a huge bottle of sun screen in the winter, it’ll just weigh you down.

Midge repellent
During the summer months and subject to weather conditions.

Lunch Bag or Box
To keep your lunch in one place and as unsquashed as possible. Note book and pen Particularly useful if you are on a skills weekend.

Survival bag and whistle
Survival bags are basically big, bright plastic bags used to keep you dry and warm in the event of an emergency (particularly in the winter) and are available from most outdoor shops. A whistle is useful for attracting attention in an emergency, although some rucksacks have them built in to the chest straps.

Personal first aid kit
Small first aid kit for personal use. Your leader will be carrying a bigger kit (and trained to use it).

Camera/Smart Phone and charger(s)

Regular medications

Also useful, but not essential:
Walking poles

Gaiters
Gaiters keep any water or rain from getting up the legs of your trousers and down in to your boots.

Liner gloves
Add another layer on colder days and also stop sweaty hands from sticking to the liners of your main gloves.

Liner socks
Some people swear by two sock layers, having a liner sock under their walking socks. You’ll just have to experiment with this one for yourself.

Trail food
We’ll provide you with a packed lunch but if you like to have a few bars or bags of nuts stuffed away in your rucksack feel free to bring them too.

Back at the accommodation:
Washbag
Toothbrush, toothpaste, soap, shampoo, shower gel etc.

Towel

Ear plugs

Dry change of clothes
To wear in the evenings and for your return journey.

Dry change of footwear
Plus something to wear around the lodge if you like your home comforts.

Walking boots
Good sturdy, waterproof walking boots. If the weather is good you may prefer lighter approach shoes.

Rock boots (Climbing shoes)
Comfortable enough to keep on for extended periods.

Helmet

Climbing harness

Belay device
If you have your own.

Climbing rack
If you have your own.

Chalk bag

Walking socks
These offer more padding than your everyday socks.

Walking/Climbing trousers
Comfortable and able to stretch in all the right places and that won't restrict movement when climbing. Softshell trousers are really comfy and provide warmth and wind resistance too.

Waterproof Jacket & Trousers (Hardshell)
Brands that use a waterproof membrane such as Gore-Tex or eVent are best. With this layer we’re looking to keep dry and protected from the wind.

Base layer
Synthetic base layers are best as they dry quickly and wick away any dampness. Cotton does not work as it holds on to the water which makes you cold.

Mid layer (Fleece or Softshell)
You might like to have a thin fleece and a softshell so that you can layer up if it gets cold. Some people prefer a fleece others prefer a softshell. With this layer we’re looking for warmth and some wind proofing. In colder weather a spare fleece is useful.

Gloves
It’s usually advisable to have at least a couple of pairs of gloves. Perhaps a liner glove to go under some thicker waterproof gloves, and even a spare pair that you keep dry in your rucksack.

Hat (and buff)
A nice woolly hat to keep you warm and buff if you like to keep the wind out around your neck. Some people like a peaked sun hat in the summer. Again a spare dry hat is useful in bad weather.

Backpack
You’ll need a backpack to hold your lunch, spare gloves, spare warm layer, first aid kit and other bits and pieces you want so you’re going to need at pack of at least 30 litres – 40 litres. A waterproof rucksack liner or dry bags are useful too.

Water
Many people like the bladder type of water container in their rucksack with the pipe and mouthpiece although a non-breakable bottle can be just as good. Make sure you have the capacity to carry at least 1.5 litres or up to 3 litres for a longer day.

Head torch
Your leaders will ensure, within their control, that you are not on the hill any longer than expected, but a head torch should be a part of everyone’s emergency kit.

Compass (Silva Expedition 4 recommended)
Not all our weekends require you to have a compass but it is always good to maintain a certain level of self reliance and a compass is a fundamental piece of kit.

Sun glasses & Sun screen
These are useful all year round although you don’t need a huge bottle of sun screen in the winter, it’ll just weigh you down.

Midge repellent
During the summer months and subject to weather conditions.

Lunch Bag or Box
To keep your lunch in one place and as unsquashed as possible. Note book and pen Particularly useful if you are on a skills weekend.

Survival bag and whistle
Survival bags are basically big, bright plastic bags used to keep you dry and warm in the event of an emergency (particularly in the winter) and are available from most outdoor shops. A whistle is useful for attracting attention in an emergency, although some rucksacks have them built in to the chest straps.

Personal first aid kit
Small first aid kit for personal use. Your leader will be carrying a bigger kit (and trained to use it).

Camera/Smart Phone and charger(s)

Regular medications

Also useful, but not essential:
Walking poles

Gaiters
Gaiters keep any water or rain from getting up the legs of your trousers and down in to your boots.

Liner gloves
Add another layer on colder days and also stop sweaty hands from sticking to the liners of your main gloves.

Liner socks
Some people swear by two sock layers, having a liner sock under their walking socks. You’ll just have to experiment with this one for yourself.

Trail food
We’ll provide you with a packed lunch but if you like to have a few bars or bags of nuts stuffed away in your rucksack feel free to bring them too.

Back at the accommodation:
Washbag
Toothbrush, toothpaste, soap, shampoo, shower gel etc.

Towel

Ear plugs

Dry change of clothes
To wear in the evenings and for your return journey.

Dry change of footwear
Plus something to wear around the lodge if you like your home comforts.

Mountaineering boots
Good sturdy, waterproof mountaineering boots with a B2 or B3 rating (crampon compatible).

Crampons (with anti-balling plate)
Crampons, if you have them, that fit your walking boots.

Ice Axe

Helmet

Climbing or mountaineering harness

Walking socks
These offer more padding than your everyday socks.

Walking trousers
Comfortable and able to stretch in all the right places. Softshell trousers are really comfy and provide warmth and wind resistance too.

Waterproof Jacket & Trousers (Hardshell)
Brands that use a waterproof membrane such as Gore-Tex or eVent are best. With this layer we’re looking to keep dry and protected from the wind.

Base layer
Synthetic base layers are best as they dry quickly and wick away any dampness. Cotton does not work as it holds on to the water which makes you cold.

Mid layer (Fleece or Softshell)
You might like to have a thin fleece and a softshell so that you can layer up if it gets cold. Some people prefer a fleece others prefer a softshell. With this layer we’re looking for warmth and some wind proofing. In colder weather a spare fleece is useful.

Gloves
It’s usually advisable to have at least a couple of pairs of gloves. Perhaps a liner glove to go under some thicker waterproof gloves, and even a spare pair that you keep dry in your rucksack.

Hat (and buff)
A nice woolly hat to keep you warm and buff if you like to keep the wind out around your neck. Some people like a peaked sun hat in the summer. Again a spare dry hat is useful in bad weather.

Backpack
You’ll need a backpack to hold your lunch, spare gloves, spare warm layer, first aid kit and other bits and pieces you want so you’re going to need at pack of at least 30 litres – 40 litres. A waterproof rucksack liner or dry bags are useful too.

Water
Many people like the bladder type of water container in their rucksack with the pipe and mouthpiece although a non-breakable bottle can be just as good. Make sure you have the capacity to carry at least 1.5 litres or up to 3 litres for a longer day.

Head torch
Your leaders will ensure, within their control, that you are not on the hill any longer than expected, but a head torch should be a part of everyone’s emergency kit.

Compass (Silva Expedition 4 recommended)
Not all our weekends require you to have a compass but it always to maintain a certain level of self reliance and a compass is a fundamental piece of kit.

Sun glasses & Sun screen
These are useful all year round although you don’t need a huge bottle of sun screen in the winter, it’ll just weigh you down.

Midge repellent
During the summer months and subject to weather conditions.

Lunch Bag or Box
To keep your lunch in one place and as unsquashed as possible. Note book and pen Particularly useful if you are on a skills weekend.

Survival bag and whistle
Survival bags are basically big, bright plastic bags used to keep you dry and warm in the event of an emergency (particularly in the winter) and are available from most outdoor shops. A whistle is useful for attracting attention in an emergency, although some rucksacks have them built in to the chest straps.

Personal first aid kit
Small first aid kit for personal use. Your leader will be carrying a bigger kit (and trained to use it).

Camera/Smart Phone and charger(s)

Regular medications

Also useful, but not essential:
Walking poles

Gaiters
Gaiters keep any water or rain from getting up the legs of your trousers and down in to your boots.

Liner gloves
Add another layer on colder days and also stop sweaty hands from sticking to the liners of your main gloves.

Liner socks
Some people swear by two sock layers, having a liner sock under their walking socks. You’ll just have to experiment with this one for yourself.

Trail food
We’ll provide you with a packed lunch but if you like to have a few bars or bags of nuts stuffed away in your rucksack feel free to bring them too.

Back at the accommodation:
Washbag
Toothbrush, toothpaste, soap, shampoo, shower gel etc.

Towel

Ear plugs

Dry change of clothes
To wear in the evenings and for your return journey.

Dry change of footwear
Plus something to wear around the lodge if you like your home comforts.

Mountain bike
In good working order.

Padlock

Helmet

Protective glasses

Cycling shoes
Subject to the peddles on your bike, you’ll need shoes with cleats or if not then flat trainers.

Padded cycling shorts
Either standard cycling shorts or heavier mountain biking shorts.

Waterproof Jacket & Trousers (Hardshell)
Brands that use a waterproof membrane such as Gore-Tex or eVent are best. With this layer we’re looking to keep dry and protected from the wind.

Base layer
Synthetic base layers or cycling tops are best as they dry quickly and wick away any dampness. Cotton does not work as it holds on to the water which makes you cold.

Mid layer (Fleece or Softshell)
You might like to have a thin fleece and a softshell so that you can layer up if it gets cold. Some people prefer a fleece others prefer a softshell. Remember, you’ll be moving most of the time but you might need an extra layer if we stop.

Gloves
It’s usually advisable to have at least a couple of pairs of gloves.

Hat (and buff)
A nice woolly hat to keep you warm and buff if you like to keep the wind out around your neck. Some people like a peaked sun hat in the summer. Again a spare dry hat is useful in bad weather.

Backpack
You’ll need a backpack to hold your lunch, spare gloves, spare warm layer, first aid kit and other bits and pieces you want so you’re going to need at pack of 10 – 15 litres.

Water
Many people like the bladder type of hydration system in their rucksack with the pipe and mouthpiece although a non-breakable bottle can be just as good. Make sure you have the capacity to carry at least 1.5 litres or up to 3 litres for a longer day.

Head torch
Your leaders will ensure, within their control, that you are not on the hill any longer than expected, but a head torch should be a part of everyone’s emergency kit.

Basic tool kit
Including 1 or 2 spare inner tubes, a small pump to carry with you.

Compass (Silva Expedition 4 recommended)
Not all our weekends require you to have a compass but it always to maintain a certain level of self reliance and a compass is a fundamental piece of kit.

Trail food
We’ll provide you with a packed lunch but if you like to have a few bars or bags of nuts stuffed away in your rucksack feel free to bring them too.

Sun glasses & Sun screen
These are useful all year round although you don’t need a huge bottle of sun screen in the winter, it’ll just weigh you down.

Midge repellent
During the summer months and subject to weather conditions.

Lunch Bag or Box
To keep your lunch in one place and as unsquashed as possible. Note book and pen Particularly useful if you are on a skills weekend.

Personal first aid kit
Small first aid kit for personal use. Your leader will be carrying a bigger kit (and trained to use it).

Camera/Smart Phone and charger(s)

Regular medications

Recommended additional equipment for more advanced rides:
Elbow and knee pads

Body armour

Back at the accommodation:
Washbag
Toothbrush, toothpaste, soap, shampoo, shower gel etc.

Towel

Ear plugs

Dry change of clothes
To wear in the evenings and for your return journey.

Dry change of footwear
Plus something to wear around the lodge if you like your home comforts.

2 DAY
ADVENTURE WEEKEND

APRIL 27TH – 29TH 2018

Summit Snowdon in April via the South Ridge

£275.00

2 DAY
ADVENTURE WEEKEND

MARCH 2ND – 4TH 2018

6 of the Best Winter Summits in Snowdonia

£275.00

2 DAY
ADVENTURE WEEKEND

MAY 11TH – 13TH 2018

Climb Snowdonia's favourites this May

£275.00

Walking boots
Good sturdy, waterproof walking boots

Walking socks
These offer more padding than your everyday socks

Walking trousers
Comfortable and able to stretch in all the right places. Softshell trousers are really comfy and provide warmth and wind resistance too.

Waterproof Jacket & Trousers (Hardshell)
Brands that use a waterproof membrane such as Gore-Tex or eVent are best. With this layer we’re looking to keep dry and protected from the wind.

Base layer
Synthetic base layers are best as they dry quickly and wick away any dampness. Cotton does not work as it holds on to the water which makes you cold.

Mid layer (Fleece or Softshell)
You might like to have a thin fleece and a softshell so that you can layer up if it gets cold. Some people prefer a fleece others prefer a softshell. With this layer we’re looking for warmth and some wind proofing. In colder weather a spare fleece is useful

Gloves
It’s usually advisable to have at least a couple of pairs of gloves. Perhaps a liner glove to go under some thicker waterproof gloves, and even a spare pair that you keep dry in your rucksack.

Hat (and buff)
A nice woolly hat to keep you warm and buff if you like to keep the wind out around your neck. Some people like a peaked sun hat in the summer. Again a spare dry hat is useful in bad weather.

Backpack
You’ll need a backpack to hold your lunch, spare gloves, spare warm layer, first aid kit and other bits and pieces you want so you’re going to need at pack of at least 30 litres – 40 litres. A waterproof rucksack liner or dry bags are useful too.

Water
Many people like the bladder type of water container in their rucksack with the pipe and mouthpiece although a non-breakable bottle can be just as good. Make sure you have the capacity to carry at least 1.5 litres or up to 3 litres for a longer day.

Head torch
Your leaders will ensure, within their control, that you are not on the hill any longer than expected, but a head torch should be a part of everyone’s emergency kit.

Compass (Silva Expedition 4 recommended)
Not all our weekends require you to have a compass but it always to maintain a certain level of self reliance and a compass is a fundamental piece of kit.

Sun glasses & Sun screen
These are useful all year round although you don’t need a huge bottle of sun screen in the winter, it’ll just weigh you down.

Midge repellent
During the summer months and subject to weather conditions.

Lunch Bag or Box
To keep your lunch in one place and as unsquashed as possible. Note book and pen Particularly useful if you are on a skills weekend.

Survival bag and whistle
Survival bags are basically big, bright plastic bags used to keep you dry and warm in the event of emergency (particularly in the winter) and are available from most outdoor shops. A whistle is useful for attracting attention in an emergency, although some rucksacks have them built in to the chest straps.

Personal first aid kit
Small first aid kit for personal use. Your leader will be carrying a bigger kit (and trained to use it).

Camera/Smart Phone and charger(s)

Regular medications

Also useful, but not essential:
Walking poles

Gaiters
Gaiters keep any water or rain from getting up the legs of your trousers and down in to your boots.

Liner gloves
Add another layer on colder days and also stop sweaty hands from sticking to the liners of your main gloves.

Liner socks
Some people swear by two sock layers, having a liner sock under their walking socks. You’ll just have to experiment with this one for yourself.

Trail food
We’ll provide you with a packed lunch but if you like to have a few bars or bags of nuts stuffed away in your rucksack feel free to bring them too.

Back at the accommodation:
Washbag
Toothbrush, toothpaste, soap, shampoo, shower gel etc

Towel

Ear plugs

Dry change of clothes
To wear in the evenings and for your return journey

Dry change of footwear
Plus something to wear around the lodge if you like your home comforts

Walking boots
Good sturdy, waterproof walking boots

Walking socks
These offer more padding than your everyday socks

Walking trousers
Comfortable and able to stretch in all the right places. Softshell trousers are really comfy and provide warmth and wind resistance too.

Waterproof Jacket & Trousers (Hardshell)
Brands that use a waterproof membrane such as Gore-Tex or eVent are best. With this layer we’re looking to keep dry and protected from the wind.

Base layer
Synthetic base layers are best as they dry quickly and wick away any dampness. Cotton does not work as it holds on to the water which makes you cold.

Mid layer (Fleece or Softshell)
You might like to have a thin fleece and a softshell so that you can layer up if it gets cold. Some people prefer a fleece others prefer a softshell. With this layer we’re looking for warmth and some wind proofing. In colder weather a spare fleece is useful

Gloves
It’s usually advisable to have at least a couple of pairs of gloves. Perhaps a liner glove to go under some thicker waterproof gloves, and even a spare pair that you keep dry in your rucksack.

Hat (and buff)
A nice woolly hat to keep you warm and buff if you like to keep the wind out around your neck. Some people like a peaked sun hat in the summer. Again a spare dry hat is useful in bad weather.

Backpack
You’ll need a backpack to hold your lunch, spare gloves, spare warm layer, first aid kit and other bits and pieces you want so you’re going to need at pack of at least 30 litres – 40 litres. A waterproof rucksack liner or dry bags are useful too.

Water
Many people like the bladder type of water container in their rucksack with the pipe and mouthpiece although a non-breakable bottle can be just as good. Make sure you have the capacity to carry at least 1.5 litres or up to 3 litres for a longer day.

Head torch
Your leaders will ensure, within their control, that you are not on the hill any longer than expected, but a head torch should be a part of everyone’s emergency kit.

Compass (Silva Expedition 4 recommended)
Not all our weekends require you to have a compass but it always to maintain a certain level of self reliance and a compass is a fundamental piece of kit.

Sun glasses & Sun screen
These are useful all year round although you don’t need a huge bottle of sun screen in the winter, it’ll just weigh you down.

Midge repellent
During the summer months and subject to weather conditions.

Lunch Bag or Box
To keep your lunch in one place and as unsquashed as possible. Note book and pen Particularly useful if you are on a skills weekend.

Survival bag and whistle
Survival bags are basically big, bright plastic bags used to keep you dry and warm in the event of emergency (particularly in the winter) and are available from most outdoor shops. A whistle is useful for attracting attention in an emergency, although some rucksacks have them built in to the chest straps.

Personal first aid kit
Small first aid kit for personal use. Your leader will be carrying a bigger kit (and trained to use it).

Camera/Smart Phone and charger(s)

Regular medications

Also useful, but not essential:
Walking poles

Gaiters
Gaiters keep any water or rain from getting up the legs of your trousers and down in to your boots.

Liner gloves
Add another layer on colder days and also stop sweaty hands from sticking to the liners of your main gloves.

Liner socks
Some people swear by two sock layers, having a liner sock under their walking socks. You’ll just have to experiment with this one for yourself.

Trail food
We’ll provide you with a packed lunch but if you like to have a few bars or bags of nuts stuffed away in your rucksack feel free to bring them too.

Back at the accommodation:
Washbag
Toothbrush, toothpaste, soap, shampoo, shower gel etc

Towel

Ear plugs

Dry change of clothes
To wear in the evenings and for your return journey

Dry change of footwear
Plus something to wear around the lodge if you like your home comforts

Walking boots
Good sturdy, waterproof walking boots

Walking socks
These offer more padding than your everyday socks

Walking trousers
Comfortable and able to stretch in all the right places. Softshell trousers are really comfy and provide warmth and wind resistance too.

Waterproof Jacket & Trousers (Hardshell)
Brands that use a waterproof membrane such as Gore-Tex or eVent are best. With this layer we’re looking to keep dry and protected from the wind.

Base layer
Synthetic base layers are best as they dry quickly and wick away any dampness. Cotton does not work as it holds on to the water which makes you cold.

Mid layer (Fleece or Softshell)
You might like to have a thin fleece and a softshell so that you can layer up if it gets cold. Some people prefer a fleece others prefer a softshell. With this layer we’re looking for warmth and some wind proofing. In colder weather a spare fleece is useful

Gloves
It’s usually advisable to have at least a couple of pairs of gloves. Perhaps a liner glove to go under some thicker waterproof gloves, and even a spare pair that you keep dry in your rucksack.

Hat (and buff)
A nice woolly hat to keep you warm and buff if you like to keep the wind out around your neck. Some people like a peaked sun hat in the summer. Again a spare dry hat is useful in bad weather.

Backpack
You’ll need a backpack to hold your lunch, spare gloves, spare warm layer, first aid kit and other bits and pieces you want so you’re going to need at pack of at least 30 litres – 40 litres. A waterproof rucksack liner or dry bags are useful too.

Water
Many people like the bladder type of water container in their rucksack with the pipe and mouthpiece although a non-breakable bottle can be just as good. Make sure you have the capacity to carry at least 1.5 litres or up to 3 litres for a longer day.

Head torch
Your leaders will ensure, within their control, that you are not on the hill any longer than expected, but a head torch should be a part of everyone’s emergency kit.

Compass (Silva Expedition 4 recommended)
Not all our weekends require you to have a compass but it always to maintain a certain level of self reliance and a compass is a fundamental piece of kit.

Sun glasses & Sun screen
These are useful all year round although you don’t need a huge bottle of sun screen in the winter, it’ll just weigh you down.

Midge repellent
During the summer months and subject to weather conditions.

Lunch Bag or Box
To keep your lunch in one place and as unsquashed as possible. Note book and pen Particularly useful if you are on a skills weekend.

Survival bag and whistle
Survival bags are basically big, bright plastic bags used to keep you dry and warm in the event of emergency (particularly in the winter) and are available from most outdoor shops. A whistle is useful for attracting attention in an emergency, although some rucksacks have them built in to the chest straps.

Personal first aid kit
Small first aid kit for personal use. Your leader will be carrying a bigger kit (and trained to use it).

Camera/Smart Phone and charger(s)

Regular medications

Also useful, but not essential:
Walking poles

Gaiters
Gaiters keep any water or rain from getting up the legs of your trousers and down in to your boots.

Liner gloves
Add another layer on colder days and also stop sweaty hands from sticking to the liners of your main gloves.

Liner socks
Some people swear by two sock layers, having a liner sock under their walking socks. You’ll just have to experiment with this one for yourself.

Trail food
We’ll provide you with a packed lunch but if you like to have a few bars or bags of nuts stuffed away in your rucksack feel free to bring them too.

Back at the accommodation:
Washbag
Toothbrush, toothpaste, soap, shampoo, shower gel etc

Towel

Ear plugs

Dry change of clothes
To wear in the evenings and for your return journey

Dry change of footwear
Plus something to wear around the lodge if you like your home comforts

Walking boots
Good sturdy, waterproof walking boots

Walking socks
These offer more padding than your everyday socks

Walking trousers
Comfortable and able to stretch in all the right places. Softshell trousers are really comfy and provide warmth and wind resistance too.

Waterproof Jacket & Trousers (Hardshell)
Brands that use a waterproof membrane such as Gore-Tex or eVent are best. With this layer we’re looking to keep dry and protected from the wind.

Base layer
Synthetic base layers are best as they dry quickly and wick away any dampness. Cotton does not work as it holds on to the water which makes you cold.

Mid layer (Fleece or Softshell)
You might like to have a thin fleece and a softshell so that you can layer up if it gets cold. Some people prefer a fleece others prefer a softshell. With this layer we’re looking for warmth and some wind proofing. In colder weather a spare fleece is useful

Gloves
It’s usually advisable to have at least a couple of pairs of gloves. Perhaps a liner glove to go under some thicker waterproof gloves, and even a spare pair that you keep dry in your rucksack.

Hat (and buff)
A nice woolly hat to keep you warm and buff if you like to keep the wind out around your neck. Some people like a peaked sun hat in the summer. Again a spare dry hat is useful in bad weather.

Backpack
You’ll need a backpack to hold your lunch, spare gloves, spare warm layer, first aid kit and other bits and pieces you want so you’re going to need at pack of at least 30 litres – 40 litres. A waterproof rucksack liner or dry bags are useful too.

Water
Many people like the bladder type of water container in their rucksack with the pipe and mouthpiece although a non-breakable bottle can be just as good. Make sure you have the capacity to carry at least 1.5 litres or up to 3 litres for a longer day.

Head torch
Your leaders will ensure, within their control, that you are not on the hill any longer than expected, but a head torch should be a part of everyone’s emergency kit.

Compass (Silva Expedition 4 recommended)
Not all our weekends require you to have a compass but it always to maintain a certain level of self reliance and a compass is a fundamental piece of kit.

Sun glasses & Sun screen
These are useful all year round although you don’t need a huge bottle of sun screen in the winter, it’ll just weigh you down.

Midge repellent
During the summer months and subject to weather conditions.

Lunch Bag or Box
To keep your lunch in one place and as unsquashed as possible. Note book and pen Particularly useful if you are on a skills weekend.

Survival bag and whistle
Survival bags are basically big, bright plastic bags used to keep you dry and warm in the event of emergency (particularly in the winter) and are available from most outdoor shops. A whistle is useful for attracting attention in an emergency, although some rucksacks have them built in to the chest straps.

Personal first aid kit
Small first aid kit for personal use. Your leader will be carrying a bigger kit (and trained to use it).

Camera/Smart Phone and charger(s)

Regular medications

Also useful, but not essential:
Walking poles

Gaiters
Gaiters keep any water or rain from getting up the legs of your trousers and down in to your boots.

Liner gloves
Add another layer on colder days and also stop sweaty hands from sticking to the liners of your main gloves.

Liner socks
Some people swear by two sock layers, having a liner sock under their walking socks. You’ll just have to experiment with this one for yourself.

Trail food
We’ll provide you with a packed lunch but if you like to have a few bars or bags of nuts stuffed away in your rucksack feel free to bring them too.

Back at the accommodation:
Washbag
Toothbrush, toothpaste, soap, shampoo, shower gel etc

Towel

Ear plugs

Dry change of clothes
To wear in the evenings and for your return journey

Dry change of footwear
Plus something to wear around the lodge if you like your home comforts

Mountain bike
In good working order.

Padlock

Helmet

Protective glasses

Cycling shoes
Subject to the peddles on your bike, you’ll need shoes with cleats or if not then flat trainers.

Padded cycling shorts
Either standard cycling shorts or heavier mountain biking shorts.

Waterproof Jacket & Trousers (Hardshell)
Brands that use a waterproof membrane such as Gore-Tex or eVent are best. With this layer we’re looking to keep dry and protected from the wind.

Base layer
Synthetic base layers or cycling tops are best as they dry quickly and wick away any dampness. Cotton does not work as it holds on to the water which makes you cold.

Mid layer (Fleece or Softshell)
You might like to have a thin fleece and a softshell so that you can layer up if it gets cold. Some people prefer a fleece others prefer a softshell. Remember, you’ll be moving most of the time but you might need an extra layer if we stop.

Gloves
It’s usually advisable to have at least a couple of pairs of gloves.

Hat (and buff)
A nice woolly hat to keep you warm and buff if you like to keep the wind out around your neck. Some people like a peaked sun hat in the summer. Again a spare dry hat is useful in bad weather.

Backpack
You’ll need a backpack to hold your lunch, spare gloves, spare warm layer, first aid kit and other bits and pieces you want so you’re going to need at pack of 10 – 15 litres.

Water
Many people like the bladder type of hydration system in their rucksack with the pipe and mouthpiece although a non-breakable bottle can be just as good. Make sure you have the capacity to carry at least 1.5 litres or up to 3 litres for a longer day.

Head torch
Your leaders will ensure, within their control, that you are not on the hill any longer than expected, but a head torch should be a part of everyone’s emergency kit.

Basic tool kit
Including 1 or 2 spare inner tubes, a small pump to carry with you.

Compass (Silva Expedition 4 recommended)
Not all our weekends require you to have a compass but it always to maintain a certain level of self reliance and a compass is a fundamental piece of kit.

Trail food
We’ll provide you with a packed lunch but if you like to have a few bars or bags of nuts stuffed away in your rucksack feel free to bring them too.

Sun glasses & Sun screen
These are useful all year round although you don’t need a huge bottle of sun screen in the winter, it’ll just weigh you down.

Midge repellent
During the summer months and subject to weather conditions.

Lunch Bag or Box
To keep your lunch in one place and as unsquashed as possible. Note book and pen Particularly useful if you are on a skills weekend.

Personal first aid kit
Small first aid kit for personal use. Your leader will be carrying a bigger kit (and trained to use it).

Camera/Smart Phone and charger(s)

Regular medications

Recommended additional equipment for more advanced rides:
Elbow and knee pads

Body armour

Back at the accommodation:
Washbag
Toothbrush, toothpaste, soap, shampoo, shower gel etc.

Towel

Ear plugs

Dry change of clothes
To wear in the evenings and for your return journey.

Dry change of footwear
Plus something to wear around the lodge if you like your home comforts.